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There are 4 item(s) tagged with the keyword "cruising".

Displaying: 41 - 4 of 4

Creating a Forecast for Your Location: Procedure and Analysis for the Amateur Weather Enthusiast

I am approaching this particular blog post with a bit of consternation and reservation. Most of us are so enthralled by the progression of daily weather that we become amateur weather observers.

Tags: cruising
By Ben May, Board Director of the National Weather Association Foundation
A Smattering of Books for the Amateur Weather Enthusiast

I tend to go overboard for books. I value my library card more than my driver’s license. But then, I’m a book addict. 

There are so many books on meteorology that it can stagger the mind. You really don’t need to read a ton of books if you are an amateur, but you should get some orientation and familiarity with terms and processes.

Tags: cruising
By Ben May, Board Director of the National Weather Association Foundation
Buoy Observations During the 1993 "Storm of the Century"

Beginning on March 8, 1993, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models consistently predicted a deep winter storm for the eastern United States on March 13. These NWP models gave excellent advance notice and produced accurate forecasts of the storm track location. However, the model runs of March 13 considerably underforecast the deepening of the storm in the northeast Gulf of Mexico.

Tags: cruising
By David Gilhousen
Hand Analysis in a Digital Age

Dive into the fascinating history of weather maps with Barbara Mayes Boustead. In this presentation she reveals the science and process of hand analysis and discusses its relevance in a world of digital maps. 

Tags: cruising

Displaying: 41 - 4 of 4

Heat Watch: A National Community-based Heat Mapping Campaign
Heat Watch: A National Community-based Heat Mapping Campaign

Over the past four summers, community scientists in over 50 US cities have set out to measure the distribution of ambient heat across urban environments as part of a national campaign ("Heat Watch") led by CAPA Strategies and NOAA's National Integrated Heat Health Information System (NIHHIS). The highly engaging program has involved hundreds of community participants as data collectors with simple-to-use equipment, engaging training material, and meaningful input to study design and interpretation of the resulting ambient heat maps. Gaining an element of civic legitimacy through the participation of local communities, the generated datasets are used by municipal planners, health departments, academic researchers, and others to identify heat vulnerabilities and rapidly advance local heat resilience efforts. 

Hailstones in Hawaii
Hailstones in Hawaii

Hailstones are a rare sight in Hawaii due to the high temperatures (averaging 22°C near the coast in February) and a steady trade wind layer shallower than 3 km. However, in winter, midlatitude fronts hit the islands and cumulonimbus associated with them often produce snow at the tops of Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa (4202 km and 4172 km in height, respectively). The combination of well-developed cumulonimbus and low temperatures at the surface sometimes leads to the observation of hailstones at ground level even in Hawaii. 

Swarm Satellites and Glacier Mapping: The Latest Headlines
Swarm Satellites and Glacier Mapping: The Latest Headlines

Here are a few of the news stories from the weather and atmospheric sciences and space that we've been following the last two weeks. Do you have a story we missed? Share it in the community!

Higher waves in the Arctic create ice-containing clouds

A team of scientists led by Dr. Jun Inoue of the National Institute of Polar Research, Japan, sought to answer a peculiar question: can higher waves in the Arctic Sea promote the development of ice-containing clouds? This question may seem strange at first, because most people would not have fathomed that a link could exist between those two natural phenomena. But the findings of this study indicate that there most likely is a connection

Lightning Megaflashes Leave Nowhere to Hide
Lightning Megaflashes Leave Nowhere to Hide

New research locates geographic hotspots for lightning “megaflashes.”

Technically defined as “a mesoscale lightning flash that is at least 100 km long” megaflashes can span hundreds of miles and create multiple lightning strikes far away from the convective core of thunderstorms, coming seemingly out of the blue or calm gray skies. This phenomenon has only recently been described and is still the subject of research. By exploring megaflash characteristics and locating the areas where these types of strikes most often occur, this study argues for the need to increase the precision and effectiveness of lightning safety warnings. 

From Observation to Contribution: Connecting Citizen Observations to the Study of Mesoscale Weather
From Observation to Contribution: Connecting Citizen Observations to the Study of Mesoscale Weather

In this presentation from the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Ted Best illustrates through case examples how the use of citizen weather observations can elucidate mesoscale convective events. A convective wind event, a long-lived thunderstorm with hail, and a mesoscale convective system with heavy rain show how individual observations can be collected to form a more detailed picture of an event for study. A combination of storm spotting, storm reports, CoCoRaHS observations, and radar images is presented for each case. These observations can call attention to events that might otherwise be missed in a busy and complex environment and can be helpful for improving future forecasts.

How Time Flies...10 years since Superstorm Sandy
October 27, 2022
How Time Flies...10 years since Superstorm Sandy

In this webinar, a panel of distinguished guests discuss Superstorm Sandy's legacy, its lasting impacts, and the lessons we have learned from that remarkable storm. 

Being a Meteorologist at a National Weather Network
May 31, 2022
Being a Meteorologist at a National Weather Network

Take a step into the studio at a national weather network to see how a 24/7 production of weather forecasts works.

Are Hurricanes Getting Worse?
Are Hurricanes Getting Worse?

To scientists who study them, there are two mysteries surrounding hurricanes that stand above the rest: Why do they exist at all, and why aren’t there many more of them? This may strike you as a paradox, but these are serious questions that arise when burrowing deep into the theory, modeling, and observations of these storms. And they bear on the question posed by the title of this essay.

By Dr. Kerry Emanuel
The 1938 Hurricane
1938 Hurricane

The Great New England Hurricane of 1938 undoubtedly IS the one to which all other New England hurricanes are sooner or later compared. There have only been three others of comparable combined strength and widespread devastation since the colonization of the region.

By Dr. Lourdes Avil├ęs
July 18, 2023
Spring Season Review...Won't Be Forgotten Any Time Soon

Join our panelists as they discuss the remarkable weather phenomena witnessed during the climatological spring season of 2023. From the Little Rock tornado to the "split" jet stream, and from extreme rain in Florida to Canadian wildfires, this webinar will explore memorable events, societal impacts, meteorological records broken, and valuable lessons learned for the weather, water, and climate enterprise. Discover how the spring of 2023 will be etched in our collective memory.

Wildfire Smoke and a Weather Ready Nation
Wildfire Smoke and a Weather Ready Nation

Tanja Fransen's presentation from the 2022 AMS Community and Citizen Science Symposium covers the increasing issues with wildfire smoke intrusions and public health and how a Weather Ready Nation needs to include partners in the public health arenas.  

In Case You Missed It: Atmosphere & Weather News
In Case You Missed It: Atmosphere & Weather News

Here are a few of the news stories from the weather and atmospheric sciences world that we've been following this week. Do you have a story we missed? Share it in the community!

Wind and Wildfire-Associated Smoke Event, September 2020
Wind and Wildfire-Associated Smoke Event, September 2020

In this presentation from the 2022 AMS Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Candice Erdmann describes how, during a severe windstorm on Labor Day 2020, several wildfires began to tear through parts of the Oregon Cascades Range. This includes a discussion of the topography, air quality monitors used, and data verification processes.

Chillin' Ain't Chillaxin'
June 2, 2023
Chillin' Ain't Chillaxin'

The lowest wind chill temperature in U.S. history was recorded on February 3, 2023, at the top of Mount Washington in New Hampshire, reaching an astounding –47°F due to powerful winds and freezing temperatures.

Superstorm 1950 with David Call
April 3, 2023
Superstorm 1950 with David Call

Explore the impact of Superstorm 1950, the greatest simultaneous blizzard, ice storm, windstorm, and cold outbreak of the twentieth century. 
 

Storm Chasing Through the Eyes of Maestros
April 13, 2023
Storm Chasing Through the Eyes of Maestros

Meteorologists Amber Liggett and Dr. Ashton Robinson Cook highlight their experiences and lessons learned in storm chasing, emphasizing the reasons for storm chasing, anecdotes, safety precautions, forecasting techniques, and potential risks involved, with the purpose of informing and guiding those interested in the activity.

By Amber Liggett and Dr Ashton Robinson Cook
SoCal Soaking: The Atmospheric River Event of January 2023
May 18, 2023
SoCal Soaking: The Atmospheric River Event of January 2023

Vivian Rennie of Central California’s KSBY TV, discusses the impacts of atmospheric rivers on California's Central Coast this January.

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of a December Tornado Outbreak
May 3, 2023
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of a December Tornado Outbreak

Join meteorologist John Gordon for a webinar on the Quad State Outbreak and gain insights into the assessment of one of the deadliest tornado outbreaks in Kentucky history.

The Past, Present, and Future of the Northeastern Storm Conference
The Past, Present, and Future of the Northeastern Storm Conference

The Northeastern Storm Conference is the largest and longest running student led conference in the nation. What once was a small meeting of students on the Lyndon State College campus has grown into a three-day conference with hundreds of attendees from across the country.

By Gabrielle Brown
How Blue Can A Blue Norther Be?
November 22, 2022
How Blue Can A Blue Norther Be?

Temperature swings can be subtle, stunning, or somewhere in between, depending in large part on what you’re used to. In a moist tropical climate, like the one that prevails over much of Hawai’i, the typical difference between nighttime lows and afternoon highs may be less than 20°F.

By Bob Henson