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There are 4 item(s) tagged with the keyword "cruising".

Displaying: 1 - 4 of 4

Creating a Forecast for Your Location: Procedure and Analysis for the Amateur Weather Enthusiast

I am approaching this particular blog post with a bit of consternation and reservation. Most of us are so enthralled by the progression of daily weather that we become amateur weather observers.

Tags: cruising
By Ben May, Board Director of the National Weather Association Foundation
A Smattering of Books for the Amateur Weather Enthusiast

I tend to go overboard for books. I value my library card more than my driver’s license. But then, I’m a book addict. 

There are so many books on meteorology that it can stagger the mind. You really don’t need to read a ton of books if you are an amateur, but you should get some orientation and familiarity with terms and processes.

Tags: cruising
By Ben May, Board Director of the National Weather Association Foundation
Buoy Observations During the 1993 "Storm of the Century"

Beginning on March 8, 1993, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models consistently predicted a deep winter storm for the eastern United States on March 13. These NWP models gave excellent advance notice and produced accurate forecasts of the storm track location. However, the model runs of March 13 considerably underforecast the deepening of the storm in the northeast Gulf of Mexico.

Tags: cruising
By David Gilhousen
Hand Analysis in a Digital Age

Dive into the fascinating history of weather maps with Barbara Mayes Boustead. In this presentation she reveals the science and process of hand analysis and discusses its relevance in a world of digital maps. 

Tags: cruising

Displaying: 1 - 4 of 4

Picking Up the Pace
February 9, 2024
Picking Up the Pace

56.7% — The probability of a hurricane’s maximum intensification rate in a 24-hour window being 20 knots (23 miles per hour) or greater for the years 2001–20—an increase from 42.3% for the years 1971–90. 

Warnings, Watches, and Advisories:  What You Need to Know
February 14, 2023
Warnings, Watches, and Advisories: What You Need to Know

Whenever weather happens, you will find a Watch, Warning, or Advisory (WWA) issued by the National Weather Service (NWS). These WWA alerts provide a heads up for when, what kind, and where a weather hazard will impact a region. The criteria for what classifies a hazard as a Watch, Warning, or Advisory varies depending on the county warning area, so it is imperative that you regularly check your local forecast carefully to understand which alert might be issued for your region.

By Amber Liggett, MSEM
Winter Lake-Effect Systems: Scientific and Educational Adventures to Further Our Knowledge and Prediction of Lake-Effect Storms
January 18, 2024
Winter Lake-Effect Systems: Scientific and Educational Adventures to Further Our Knowledge and Prediction of Lake-Effect Storms

A team of expert scientists discuss their collaborative efforts and lessons learned from field campaigns designed to better understand and forecast intense lake-effect storms.

Hurricanes of 2023: A Review
December 21, 2023
Hurricanes of 2023: A Review

The 2023 hurricane season has come to a close. It’s been an eventful few months, with some strange storms! 

2024 Jamposium FAQs Answered!
January 12, 2024
2024 Jamposium FAQs Answered!

Melissa Griffin, the incoming Weather Band Committee Chair, is here to answer some frequently asked questions about the 2024 Jamposium! 

Extreme Weather Events: 2023 In Review
December 28, 2023
Extreme Weather Events: 2023 In Review

WeatherNation's Lead Meteorologist Steve Glazier recaps the top ten weather events in the United States this year. 

Are You Ocean Safe? A Conversation with Bruckner Chase
August 18, 2021
Are You Ocean Safe? A Conversation with Bruckner Chase

This high energy conversation between Bruckner Chase and Weather-Ready Nation's Doug Hilderbrand focuses on beach and coastline safety and forecasting. Bruckner is an internationally renowned adventure-athlete, ocean advocate, and resident expert for NOAA Ocean and Coastal Safety campaigns. You'll get a taste of what it means to be a weather expert at and for the ocean, and get an inside look at the lifeguard mindset by learning more about what to look for to stay safe at the beach, how to forecast and plan for hazards, and what the major hazards might be in different weather conditions.

How Hot is Too Hot?
September 10, 2021
How Hot is Too Hot?

Join the AMS Weather Band for a talk from Jared Rennie of the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies!

His recent research analyzes and expands on the current understanding of extreme heat events. This presentation looks at how extreme heat events are classified; how heat waves impact human health; what meteorological data besides temperature matter most for understanding heat impacts; and what different warning products can be created to help people avoid severe impacts.

Winter Weather: Forecasting Snow and the Challenges That Come With It
February 23, 2022
Winter Weather: Forecasting Snow and the Challenges That Come With It

Millersville University Weather Information Center (WIC) Director Kyle Elliott shows how to recognize and analyze the large-scale weather patterns that are favorable for winter storm formation.

Numerical Weather Prediction & Model Performance: What Everyone Should Know
May 16, 2022
Numerical Weather Prediction & Model Performance: What Everyone Should Know
The New Face of Severe Weather--As Manifest at the Higher Level of "Earth's Reality Game"
November 12, 2023
The New Face of Severe Weather--As Manifest at the Higher Level of "Earth's Reality Game"

In recent years, US weather threats have changed significantly, shifting from more "traditional" weather hazards to new challenges. The adaptive and flexible mindset of gamers might prove to be an important asset to help us address 21st century challenges.  

By William H. Hooke
"It Just Seems Like Storms Always Go There, Not Here"
November 6, 2023
"It Just Seems Like Storms Always Go There, Not Here"

Have you ever felt this way about the place you live? Does it feel like anytime storms roll through, the worst seems to go around you? Do you feel, deep down, like the place you live just won’t be hit by a tornado? Or if you live along the coast, perhaps, that a hurricane is unlikely to affect you directly?
You might not be alone, and the effect of these beliefs, in some cases, could be consequential.
 

By Kim Klockow McClain
Summer Season Review...Wildfires, Extreme Heat, and Beach Safety
November 1, 2023
Summer Season Review...Wildfires, Extreme Heat, and Beach Safety

This webinar will look back on a hot, and at times, tragic summer season.

Inside the Hurricane Hunters
May 11, 2021
Inside the Hurricane Hunters

Lt. Col. Nicole Mitchell takes the AMS Weather Band inside the missions and experiences of the renowned Hurricane Hunters! This special event also features discussion with Bryan Norcross as moderator.

May Events
May Events

Join us for a variety of events throughout May. We've got an amazing conversation with Lt. Col. Nicole Mitchell, formerly of the Hurricane Hunters, to celebrate Hurricane Preparedness Week, and the Weather Band will be hosting instrument companies for Q&A sessions beginning May 19th and continuing into June. 

What is Reality? Trends in US Sever Weather
February 24, 2023
What is Reality? Trends in US Sever Weather
2023 Winter Season... Won't Soon Be Forgotten
February 25, 2023
2023 Winter Season... Won't Soon Be Forgotten
Top 10 U.S. Weather Events of 2022
February 25, 2023
Top 10 U.S. Weather Events of 2022
A Cat. 5 Five Years Later... the Lasting Legacy of Hurricane Michael
October 10, 2023
A Cat. 5 Five Years Later... the Lasting Legacy of Hurricane Michael

On October 10, 2018, Hurricane Michael made landfall near Mexico Beach, Florida, and became the first Category 5 hurricane to make landfall in the contiguous United States since Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

Cultivating a Model for Post-Tornado Fieldwork at NSSL
October 9, 2023
Cultivating a Model for Post-Tornado Fieldwork at NSSL

In just a few decades’ time, the physical science of meteorology has evolved rapidly, aided in part by increasingly sophisticated field campaigns of many kinds. Spurred by an explosion of scientific development, including improved theoretical and empirical research in recent years, alongside growth in the hiring of social scientists within meteorological organizations, social science fieldwork is now experiencing its own surge of growth. This article will describe a little bit of the NSSL team’s approach, highlighting our study of the December 10, 2021 tornado outbreak as an example of what we hope to do for many key events now and in the future.

By Kim Klockow McClain