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There are 13 item(s) tagged with the keyword "BAMS".

Displaying: 351 - 13 of 13

Tomorrow's Scientists

At the 72nd International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) in Atlanta, Georgia, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) awarded seven high school students for outstanding atmospheric science projects, part of the Regeneron ISEF program with students from the United States and 62 other countries participating in a hybrid event.

Tags: Tomorrow's Scientists, BAMS
Clam-oring for Data

What the quahog clam can tell us about ancient climate. 

Tags: Parcels, BAMS
Interview: Understanding the Science of Uncertainty

BAMS recently spoke with Tim Palmer about his new book, The Primacy of Doubt: From Quantum Physics to Climate Change, How the Science of Uncertainty Can Help Us Understand Our Chaotic World.

Tags: Interview, Readings, BAMS
In Search of Drought

Brandi Gamelin of Argonne National Laboratory discusses recent research that employs vapor pressure deficit (VPD) rather than precipitation as a method to forecast drought in the United States.

Tags: Parcels, BAMS
Readings - In Brief

Three books are presented for your consideration. Introduction to the Physics and Techniques of Remote Sensing (Third Edition) discusses the use of remote sensing for a variety of sciences and studies. Atmospheric Evolution on Inhabited and Lifeless Worlds explains how atmospheric evolution can determine a planet's habitability. Beyond Carbon Neutral: How We Fix the Climate Crisis Now presents strategies for addressing climate change with tools currently in place. 

Tags: In Brief, Readings, BAMS
Mariama Feaster

Mariama Feaster, graduate research assistant at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, on how her undergraduate experience helped shape the direction of her career goals.

Tags: Clear Skies Ahead, BAMS
More Than A Scientist: Samuel Larsen

Q&A with Samuel Larsen, Xcel Energy Data Scientist and member of the AMS Board on Early Career Professionals.

Tags: BAMS, More Than A Scientist
William Turner IV

William Turner IV, a Ph.D. student in atmospheric sciences at the University of California, Davis, on his decision to pursue a doctoral degree and the process that involved.

Tags: Clear Skies Ahead, BAMS
They Have the An(t)swers on Snow Depth

Inspired by the movement of ants within a colony, Hu took a novel approach to the limitations of using lidar for measuring snow depth.

Tags: BAMS
Clear Skies Ahead: Alyssa Bates

ALYSSA BATES is the research associate at the Cooperative Institute for Severe and High-Impact Weather Research and Operations.

Tags: BAMS

Displaying: 351 - 13 of 13

How the First Weather "Computers" Changed World War II
How the First Weather "Computers" Changed World War II

Behind the bloody beaches of D-Day and the deathly bloom of mushroom clouds in the bright desert, behind supercomputers and the weather app on your phone, there is a mainly unrecognized group of young women who wielded the power of math to change the course of history. 

Weather and the Ski Industry
Weather and the Ski Industry

Join Mallory Brooke of Nor'Easter Weather Consulting as she takes us inside the weather and the ski industry to look at teleconnections, forecasting tools, and how forecasts are used for events like the World Cup at Killington. This will also include a deeper dive into different weather issues and their impacts at the World Cup years 2016-2019.

Trustworthy AI for Severe Weather
Trustworthy AI for Severe Weather

Join Dr. McGovern for an introduction to Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and their applications for severe weather. Dr. Amy McGovern is the Lloyd G. and Joyce Austin Presidential Professor at the School of Computer Science and School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. McGovern is also the director of the NSF AI Institute for Research on Trustworthy AI in Weather, Climate, and Coastal Oceanography. Her research focuses on developing and applying trustworthy AI and machine learning methods primarily for severe weather phenomena as changes in weather patterns, oceans, sea level rise, and disaster risk amplify the need for accelerated AI research in the environmental sciences.

Webinar: A Windstorm Resilience Success Story
Webinar on 12/3: A Windstorm Resilience Success Story

This webinar explores perhaps one of the least known but most successful windstorm mitigation programs in the United States, the IBHS FORTIFIED Home Program. We will explore the origins of the program and how decades of wind engineer research was applied to create a practical way to build better for both new homes and retrofits.

How Did Barometers Change Hurricane Research? Lessons from 1600s Barbados
How Did Barometers Change Hurricane Research? Lessons from 1600s Barbados

"I believe, there might be excellent use made of the Barometer for predicting of Hurricanes, and other Tempests, especially at sea; since I am credibly informed, that a person of quality, who lives by the sea-side...can by the Barometer almost infallibly foretell any great tempest for several hours before it begins.”

How to Monitor Drought and Build Community in the Desert Southwest
How to Monitor Drought and Build Community in the Desert Southwest

As billion dollar disasters continue to take place across the United States, communities are racing to increase their mitigation and response planning for these events. But some are more difficult to plan for than others. Drought in particular can be difficult to get good measurements and data for. It can also have impacts on community life and economic activity that are difficult to separate out from other events. 

Public Engagement for the Fifth National Climate Assessment
Public Engagement for the Fifth National Climate Assessment

The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and the authors of the Fifth National Climate Assessment (NCA5) are hosting a series of virtual public engagement workshops to inform development of this federal climate report. These workshops are free and open to the public. The information gathered in this workshop will help authors decide which topics to cover in their chapter of the Fifth National Climate Assessment, a major U.S. Government report on how climate change affects people and places in the United States.

Symposium Presentation Schedule
Symposium Presentation Schedule

Join us for the first AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium on January 21 and 22! Our speaker schedule is below. We look forward to seeing you there! 

What Inspired the First European Images of Tornadoes
What Inspired the First European Images of Tornadoes

In addition to art, culture, and philosophy, the European Renaissance (1400-1600 CE) brought the first serious attempts to predict the weather and new approaches to forecasting. While the invention of measurement devices such as the thermometer (in 1607) and the barometer (1643) was yet to come, increased interest in weather observations came from the “discoveries” of new lands and seas, which considerably enlarged and widened old ideas and conceptions. 

Weather in the Dark: North Pole-1 and the Siberian Weather Stations of the 1930s
Weather in the Dark: North Pole-1 and the Siberian Weather Stations of the 1930s

Imagine, if you will, spending an entire year on a floating chunk of ice in the Arctic ocean: drifting gently through arctic waters, you are unable to steer around other icebergs or escape storms and left to the mercy of howling winds, snow, and sun. During the winter, 24 hours of darkness is alleviated only by the amount of electricity you can peddle out of a bicycle-powered generator. Your bed will be inside an eider-down tent lined in fur. And every day you wake up to launch weather balloons at strict intervals. 

Deadly Weather During the Race to the South Pole
Deadly Weather During the Race to the South Pole

The Norwegian and British Antarctic expeditions to the South Pole are often regarded as the height of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. Using a team of five men and primarily relying on dog sledges, Roald Amundsen first reached the geographic South Pole on 14 December 1911. Just over a month later, a team of five men led by Captain Robert Falcon Scott reached the South Pole on 17 January 1912, only to find a tent left by Amundsen.

Building Next Generation Public Weather Observation Networks with STEM and Citizen Science Initiatives
Building Next Generation Public Weather Observation Networks with STEM and Citizen Science Initiatives

The development of high-resolution weather forecasts, and immediate issuance of weather warnings requires a high coverage of local and upper-air meteorological observation data to proceed. Conventional weather observation networks have fostered these applications and the advancement in urban meteorology forecast for more than a century. Now, with the emerging trend in citizen science programs, numerous private-owned weather stations using commercial weather instruments are springing up around the world. And this fast growing coverage of observation data has become available to the scientific community.

The Virtual Operations Support Team (VOST) at the University at Albany
The Virtual Operations Support Team (VOST) at the University at Albany

In 2019, the University at Albany launched the Virtual Operation Support Team (VOST), a student-led, faculty supervised initiative whereby undergraduate and graduate students were trained in crowdsourcing information from social media. As a part of their training, the interns learned about data scraping, misinformation and misinformation management, and the most effective ways to search for, summarize, and present trends in social media data. The VOST also served to support New York State's Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services (DHSES) through the development of social media summaries and after-action reports. The program has had five cohorts of students that tracked sixteen incidents, complied over 70 social media reports, and engaged in one real-time activation. In this presentation, from the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Dr. Amber Silver provides an overview of the University at Albany's VOST program, including the benefits to both students and the community at large.

The WeatherBlur Program
The WeatherBlur Program

The WeatherBlur Program is a student-led non-hierarchical citizen science platform where your students can wonder, investigate, work with data and then act to make their community a better place! The National Weather Service in Gray, Maine has provided support for the WeatherBlur program for over a decade, supporting impactful K-8 student led investigations across the US. In this presentation from the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Nikki Becker of the National Weather Service leads the audience through the details of the WeatherBlur program and the incredible impact it's having on teachers and students alike.

Citizen Science and Historical Weather: the DRAW Experience
Citizen Science and Historical Weather: the DRAW Experience

In this talk presented at the 2022 AMS Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Dr. Victoria Slonosky discusses how citizen scientists around the world have been transcribing historical weather observations. Her project, the McGill DRAW (Data Rescue: Archives and Weather) is working with citizen scientists to transcribe the McGill Observatory weather records, which represent one of the best sets of historical weather in Canada. The complete original records are being transcribed, including variables such as cloud cover and weather symbols. Nearly 1.5 million data points have been transcribed by hundreds of users, with a core group of superusers becoming experts in historical climate observations.

Assessment of the 2018 Four Corners Drought using CoCoRaHS Condition Monitoring Reports
Assessment of the 2018 Four Corners Drought using CoCoRaHS Condition Monitoring Reports

In this presentation from the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Dr. Becky Bolinger, Assistant State Climatologist for Colorado, presents some interesting results from CoCoRaHS Condition Monitoring reports. CoCoRaHS observers can enter reports describing how dry or wet their location has been, called Condition Monitoring reports. Here, she has gathered all the reports made during and after the 2018 drought across CO, NM, AZ, and UT and evaluated them compared to drought data.

Our Community and Citizen Science Symposium Speakers
Our Community and Citizen Science Symposium Speakers

We are thrilled to have an amazing line up of speakers for the upcoming Weather Band Citizen and Community Science Symposium. To give you a small sneak preview of what's to come, here are short biographies for some of our speakers. They are arranged alphabetically, with more to come in the weeks ahead. A huge thank you to all of our speakers, and don't forget to register for the event! 

Want to Volunteer with CoCoRaHS?
Want to Volunteer with CoCoRaHS?

Interested in becoming a CoCoRaHS volunteer or just want to know more about what it's like to be a volunteer? Watch this fun video from James Kendall, who shared his experiences as part of the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium.

A Ten Year Climate History in New Mexico
A Ten Year Climate History in New Mexico

Using soil moisture and rain/snowfall data, Peter Callen has come up with a system of rating each month's overall relative wetness/dryness on a scale from -2 to +2. In this presentation from the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Peter details how the months are added up for each year, and how he creates charts shows the monthly and yearly changes for the past 10 years.

Collaborative Weather Collection by APS and Two Philadelphia Schools
Collaborative Weather Collection by APS and Two Philadelphia Schools

In a partnership now entering its second year, the American Philosophical Society and two Philadelphia area schools are continuing the weather data collection and observations that were started by some of our country's great 18th century thinkers. During this presentation from Dave Curry and Alexandra Rospond, you'll find out how students are connecting past with present as they learn to collect accurate local synoptic weather data.

NASA's GLOBE and CLOUD GAZE Programs
NASA's GLOBE and CLOUD GAZE Programs

In this interactive talk presented at the 2022 AMS Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Jessica Taylor and Dr. Jay Welsh from NASA walk the audience through the ins and outs of the award winning GLOBE and CLOUD GAZE programs, including how to use the app, what happens to your data, and how you can see what's being tracked around the world.

Storm Intercept Weather Network: The Truth on the Ground
Storm Intercept Weather Network: The Truth on the Ground

In this presentation from the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Craig Lowe shows how Bahamian Storm and Hurricane Interceptors came to be and what they do to assist The Bahamas Department of Meteorology and The National Emergency Management Agency with valuable information on active Weather Threats.

Ranking Tornado Outbreaks
Ranking Tornado Outbreaks

I was listening to the WeatherBrains podcast (Episode 806) and there was a discussing what constitutes a tornado outbreak and the fact that there is not a rigorous definition for the term outbreak. And I am not sure there is a need to define the term for meteorological purposes. But I wondered if I could come up with my own Outbreak Index to allow comparison and ranking of events that might be termed a tornado outbreak.

Rain or Snow? That is the Question
Rain or Snow? That is the Question

Did you know that snow can fall at temperatures above freezing? In this presentation from the 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium, Jeff Uhlik describes the impact of community engagement through the Tahoe Rain or Snow project. The group is working to reduce inaccuracies in determining precipitation type by estimating the temperature of the rain-snow boundary, which is used in weather forecasts and hydrologic models. With help from Tahoe Rain or Snow weather spotters, they have been able to record evidence of snow consistently falling at above-freezing temperatures in the Sierra Nevada. This project is now expanding in 21/22 to include many parts of the Western US.

2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium
2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium

The 2022 AMS Weather Band Community and Citizen Science Symposium was a huge success thanks to its amazing speakers and enthusiastic attendees. Over 350 people registered for the event, which showcased nearly 30 speakers over two days of presentations. This was the first time that the AMS Weather Band has held this event, and it was a true testament to the high quality of citizen and community scientists, as well as to the programs that train and support these weather enthusiasts.